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Literary Analysis

Theres several questions about different stories that need to be answered. Their are two parts to this assignment. The instructions are as follows.PART 1 Answer each question in five or more complete sentences. Please refer to specific details and include quotations from the works of literature in your answers. You may certainly do additional research if you wish, but don't plagiarize; indicate all information, opinions, and ideas that you take from sources, and document the material correctly. Ideas and information from published sources (including print and online publications) and other students MUST be documented correctly to receive any credit on the quiz. Feel free to look at the questions, reread the texts, look for information, and even discuss them on Discussions before submitting your answers -- as long as you document your sources correctly. 1-Who is speaking in this passage in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, and what incident provokes the speech? Explain in five or more sentences why it is a turning point in the novel. Is there a comparable turning point in Alcott's Work? “Dat truck dah is trash; en trash is what people is dat puts dirt on de head er dey fren’s en makes ’em ashamed.” 2-In “The Deliverance,” what changes does Harper depict in the relationship between the slaves and the owners over the course of the poem? How does Chloe evidently feel about her owners at the beginning of the poem, and at what points in the poem do those feelings evidently change? 3-In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, what is the decision that causes Huck Finn to say, “All right, then, I'll go to hell”? What is Mark Twain implying about organized religion as a source of moral guidance? In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, where does Huck find the best moral inspiration? 4-Can you blame me if I've learned to think Your hate of vice a sham, When you so coldly crushed me down And then excused the man? What is the situation depicted in Harper's “A Double Standard”? Why has the status of the fictional character speaking in the poem changed so drastically, and why is she so bitter? You can draw on information about a comparable scenario in Work: A Story of Experience in your answer. 5-“We said there warn't no home like a raft, after all. Other places do seem so cramped up and smothery, but a raft don't. You feel mighty free and easy and comfortable on a raft.” What qualities or values does Twain associate with Huck and Jim's raft on the Mississippi? What places or situations contrast with the “free and easy” life on the raft, and what qualities does Twain associate with those “other places”? Give specific examples. 6-What is an unreliable narrator in a work of fiction? Describe a specific example from the works we've read so far this semester. PART 2 Answer each question in 5 or more complete sentences. Strong answers draw on relevant background information, including historical facts and the concepts and vocabulary of current literary scholarship, to arrive at thoughtful interpretations of the descriptive details, characterizations, settings, and plot events in Sister Carrie; illustrative quotations from Sister Carrie are welcome. After looking at the questions, you may reread Sister Carrie, discuss ideas through the Discussion Board, and do additional research, but you must correctly document any sources that you use to produce your answers. (Plagiarism in any answer is grounds for failing the quiz as a whole.) 1- Here was a type of the traveling canvasser for a manufacturing house--a class which at that time was first being dubbed by the slang of the day ‘drummers.’ He came within the meaning of a still newer term, which had sprung into general use among Americans in 1880, and which concisely expressed the thought of one whose dress or manners are calculated to elicit the admiration of susceptible young women--a ‘masher.’ Which character does this passage describe? How does his line of work and his personality reflect some important economic and social developments in American life at the end of the nineteenth century? (Of course, these economic and social developments are thematically important throughout Sister Carrie, not just in this brief episode.) 2-What does Carrie do to get promoted to a star's status and salary when she is performing the role of the Quaker girl in the Casino show? How does this episode illustrate Theodore Dreiser's deterministic beliefs? (Relevant quotations from Sister Carrie are especially welcome to explain the second part of this question. 3-Why does Carrie decide to accept Drouet's offer to provide a room for her soon after she comes to Chicago? You may describe either her motivation or plot mechanics or both--but refer explicitly to descriptive details, interior monologues, or speeches from the text of Sister Carrie. 4- He took out the drawer again and lifted the bills. They were so smooth, so compact, so portable. How little they made, after all. He decided he would take them. Yes, he would. He would put them in his pocket. Then he looked at that and saw they would not go there. His hand satchel! To be sure, his hand satchel. They would go in that--all of it would. No one would think anything of it either. He went into the little office and took it from the shelf in the corner. Which character is this passage describing, and what is the decision he is making here? What eventually impels him to take the bills, after his hesitation? How do the particular details of the episode emphasize Dreiser's philosophical beliefs? 5- Men and women hurried by in long, shifting lines. She felt the flow of the tide of effort and interest–felt her own helplessness without realizing the wisp on the tide that she was. Along with several other writers of his era, Dreiser identified himself as a Naturalist. How does Sister Carrie illustrate the Naturalist philosophy? What are the most important forces–internal and external–that shape the respective fates of Hurstwood and Carrie? 6-Extra Credit: Of which character does Carrie say, "He probably could be happy all alone. He's so strong"? What aspects of this character’s occupation might distinguish him from Hurstwood, Carrie, and Drouet?
Theres several questions about different stories that need to be answered. Their are two parts to this assignment. The instructions are as follows.PART 1 Answer each question in five or more complete sentences. Please refer to specific details and include quotations from the works of literature in your answers.
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Assignment ID
26365
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CREATED ON
May 11, 2016
COMPLETED ON
May 12, 2016
Price
$30
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