ASSIGNMENT ID
106114
SUBJECT AREA Other
DOCUMENT TYPE Other types
CREATED ON 21st February 2017
COMPLETED ON 24th February 2017
PRICE
$40
15 OFFERS RECEIVED.
Expert hired: neacy

Wuthering Heights

This assignment is about "Brontë, Emily. Wuthering Heights (1847). Norton Critical Edition. New York: WW Norton and Company. 2003."
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Studybay assignment progress timeline

Studybay is a freelance platform where you can order a Wuthering Heights paper, written from scratch by professors and tutors.
21 February 2017
User created a project for Other
21 February 2017
15 experts responded
21 February 2017
User contacted expert neacy
21 February 2017
User hired expert neacy who offered a price of $40 for the project and has experience doing similar projects
24 February 2017
The expert completed the project Wuthering Heights for 3 days, meeting the deadline
24 February 2017
User accepted the project right away and completed the payment
24 February 2017
User left a positive review

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