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How to Write a Comic Strip for Yourself and Others

How to Write a Comic Strip: Want to produce a comic strip? Start drawing or writing! If you can imagine it, then you can draw a comic strip.

How to Write a Comic Strip - The Introduction

Do you want to draw a comic that’s funny, sad, bizarre, or just plain weird? Start the comic strip drawing process by thinking about things that you see daily. Your comic strip doesn’t have to be the Mona Lisa of comic strips, it can be as simple or as complex as you would like it to be. Was there a roadside billboard that caught your attention? Maybe you could write a witty little comic strip about the workers that hung that billboard sign. Perhaps you had a weird dream last night, then you might begin your comic strip brainstorming process about that!

Cavemen from millennia ago were making comic strips about their daily lives, and now we study those drawings to see how they lived. Who knows, perhaps in a post-apocalyptic world, your comic strip drawings may be the only thing that future anthropologists have to determine what kind of lives humans here on Earth led. Maybe a few friends will get a kick and a laugh out of reading some lines that you wrote. It is up to you, how to write a comic strip. While writing a comic strip can be fun, you might want to use a simple comic to brush out the broad strokes before you commit to drafting out an entire series. Writing short, easy comic strips in your spare time can help your comic strip writing skills stay sharp, and you can incubate ideas and other projects as you practice with short, easy comic strips, too! If you find yourself stuck for what to do when drafting up your short, easy comics, all you need to do is develop a premise and put pencil to paper. Soon your short, funny comic will be done!

Have you heard a good spoken word joke lately? Start your comic strip premise with that joke! “Say, Fred, did you hear the one about the farmer that had a bull…” Do you like to draw political comic strips? Look in the local, state, national, and international news! You can also take inspiration from what other comic strip writers do. There is no wrong place to start brainstorming premises about how to write a comic strip.

How to write a comic strip: Developing a Comic Strip

There are two integral pieces to a comic strip that go hand-in-hand: the art and the verbal (or non-verbal) dialogue. It’s ultimately up to you to decide where you want to start. If your comic strip premise is well thought out, then you may already have a written dialogue for your comic strip. Think about the characters in that setting, and start drawing your rough sketches! If you’re thinking about how to write a comic strip, then you’re on the right track. Typically, comic strip drawings are 1-3 panels long, so there’s not a lot of time to flesh out your comic strip. Your ideas should be focused into expressing your premise succinctly and directly. Is your comic strip going to be a simple, one-time comic, or are you going to write your comic strip in an episodic fashion? An ongoing series of comics can have much more depth to the characters and settings, allowing you to develop your stories and backgrounds. You can also include many more characters when writing in a long term setting.

When you begin sketching rough drafts of your comic strip, develop your characters as well as possible by including notes on the pages below them. Give them a past, a present, and a future. This comic strip is yours to do what you want with. What do the characters do for a living? What kind of car do they drive around? Does your character wear a certain type of clothing? Do they have a hairstyle that is unique? You should attempt to delve deeply into the backstory of your characters so that the narrative of the character can be relayed to your readers. Although you may not reveal every small idiosyncrasy of the characters to your readers, you will be able to connect to the comic strip more fluidly by fleshing out their backstories. You should be able to write as if you were there in the scene with them.

What kind of setting are you going to include in your comic strip? This could be a dark alley, a bowling alley, an old abandoned castle, a lily pad in the middle of a swamp, a school, a workplace, a rooftop, or even your own living room. The artistry is not important! It is more important that the premise of your comic strip is conveyed well. Easy to draw shapes, like ovals, squares, circles, and rectangles, can simulate boxes, control panels, barrels, buckets, refrigerators, mountains and more. Smooth shapes and lines, such as circles and semi-circles, can be drawn for leaves, trees, grass and other organic materials. Man-made objects are often more hard-edged, linear, and blocky. By adding simple shapes, like a square to a rectangle, the illustrator can give the illusion of depth if used appropriately. Think of it as an untimed game, where the goal is to get the reader to see your idea. Again, it doesn’t have to be perfectly proportioned, or even beautiful, but with time your artistry skills will definitely improve. Anyone can figure out how to write a comic strip, from the lowliest stick figure maker to the most renowned Disney illustrators.

Again, from earlier, your plot must be succinct in order to convey your message in a small space. It should be intriguing and focused to the key points of your comic. It is time to make an important decision about the major plot points in your comic strip. Do the characters endure conflict, either emotional or physical? Do they have superpowers? Do they have enemies? Is your character the good guy or the bad guy? If you want to come back again and again to a plot point, make sure that the reader understands it in the first place. Determine what kind of effect the plot points have on your comic strip characters. Your characters should be developed a little bit by now, and your dialogue should come quite naturally, as though you knew the characters yourself. (Which you do.)

How to write a comic strip: Drawing Your Comic Strip

While thinking about how to write a comic strip, did you brainstorm about how many panels you want your comic strip to be? A simple one-panel comic strip is perhaps the easiest to coordinate. It is usually a one-liner, with a punch line included. The reader doesn’t know what occurred before the scene, and they won’t know what occurs after the scene. Any information that is relevant to the joke should be included for the reader. If the comic strip is well written, then they should have no issue following your dialogue. By conveying your message simply and succinctly, your single frame comic strip will be easy to understand and effective for the reader.

How to write a comic strip in two panels: this is perhaps the most difficult and underestimated comic strip to produce. Much like the single panel strip, the message must be conveyed in a short time. The difference is that now, either panel may be the joke. Perhaps the first panel is the joke, followed by a reaction from the second panel, or vice versa. Maybe the second panel is a response to the first panel’s question. There are innumerable ways to get your message across through a two-panel comic strip. Don’t be too hard on yourself about a two-panel strip; many professional artists believe that it is the hardest format of comics to perfect.

How to write a comic strip in three or More Panels

The three or more panel comic strip is more flexible in format, and can include longer jokes with more dialogue and intricacy. A more extensive background can be achieved, even in such a few frames as are allowed in these small storyboards. Your comic can really start to come to life in a multi-panel format, so get in there and give it to the reader! Your stories can be fleshed out a little bit more than in the one and two-panel comics. Now that we’ve figured out how to write a comic strip, let’s go and have fun with it!

How to Write a Comic Strip for Yourself and Others

  • Start the comic strip drawing process by thinking about things that you see daily.
  • Your comic strip doesn’t have to be the Mona Lisa of comic strips, it can be as simple or as complex as you would like it to be.
  • Start your comic strip premise with a joke!
  • There are two integral pieces to a comic strip that go hand-in-hand: the art and the verbal (or non-verbal) dialogue.
  • Typically, comic strip drawings are 1-3 panels long, so there’s not a lot of time to flesh out your comic strip.
  • When you begin sketching rough drafts of your comic strip, develop your characters as well as possible by including notes on the pages below them.
  • Give them a past, a present, and a future.
  • What kind of setting are you going to include in your comic strip?
  • Anyone can figure out how to write a comic strip, from the lowliest stick figure maker to the most renowned Disney illustrators.
  • Your plot must be succinct in order to convey your message in a small space. It should be intriguing and focused to the key points of your comic.
  • A simple one-panel comic strip is perhaps the easiest to coordinate. It is usually a one-liner, with a punch line included.
  • Two panels: this is perhaps the most difficult and underestimated comic strip to produce. Much like the single panel strip, the message must be conveyed in a short time.
  • The three or more panel comic strip is more flexible in format, and can include longer jokes with more dialogue and intricacy.

Now that we’ve figured out how to write a comic strip, let’s go and have fun with it!

How to Write a Comic Strip: Want to produce a comic strip? Start drawing or writing! If you can imagine it, then you can draw a comic strip.

How to Write a Comic Strip - The Introduction

Do you want to draw a comic that’s funny, sad, bizarre, or just plain weird? Start the comic strip drawing process by thinking about things that you see daily.

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100000153
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CREATED ON
June 19, 2016
COMPLETED ON
June 20, 2016
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$40
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