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Discover About The Holy Paradox at Donne's Batter My Heart

Project id 1014922
Subject area Writing
Document type Essay
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The Holy Paradox at Donne's Batter My Heart Even the excellent paradox of the Christian faith lies in the condition that in order to become truly free, the spirit must first be spared from the bondage of sin, then recaptured and fully conquered by God. One of the most profound expressions of the matter is to be located in John Donne' poem, "Batter My Heart" (Meyer 882). Donne conveys this spiritual transformation in intensely enthusiastic speech, using rhythm, figures of speech, and seems to convey this theme. The poem opens with a bang because the speaker addresses God as "three-personed God" (1), thus the Christian God, using a dire demand. The opening point utilizes iambic pentameter meter using a rhythm which indicates the sound of someone beating on a doorway, together with the "bam, pa, pa, bam" sound, repeated: "Batter my heart, three-personed God," (line 1, italics mine). The poem starts with alternating trochaic and iambic toes, which make the drumbeat rhythm, and improve the tone of desperation in your voice. The urgency of the plea is expressed from the direct control, which finishes with a caesura. This is followed by the starting line's enjambment that rushes the plea ahead into another line to describe that urgency. The rhythm then changes to a diminished faucet, tap, tap, Id tap, ta tap because the speaker tells God that he's been gentle and kindly, "for You/ As yet but knock, breathe, shine, and seek to fix" (1-2). The spondee pressures on the third foot of this line indicate a deliberate knock, knock, knock, nevertheless the verbs reveal God's silent, but persistent concern, and the speaker indicates has been too simple, thus much: God, as Holy Spirit, breathes, beams, and mends. The verb "knock" in line 2 could well refer to Revelation 3:20: "...

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