Disgust

/dɪsˈɡʌst/

Origin

1590–1600; (v.) < Middle French desgouster, equivalent to des- dis-1 + gouster to taste, relish, derivative of goust taste < Latin gusta (see choose); (noun) < Middle French desgoust, derivative of the v. (Source: dictionary.com)

Late 16th century from early modern French desgoust or Italian disgusto, from Latin dis- (expressing reversal) + gustus ‘taste’. (Source: lexico.com)

Definitions of Disgust

Disgust

verb (used with object)

  1. to cause loathing or nausea in.
  2. to offend the good taste, moral sense, etc., of; cause extreme dislike or revulsion in:

dictionary.com

Disgust

noun

  1. a strong distaste; nausea; loathing.
  2. repugnance caused by something offensive; strong aversion:
  3. a great loathing or distaste aroused by someone or something
  4. in disgust as a result of disgust

dictionary.com

Disgust

verb

  1. to sicken or fill with loathing
  2. to offend the moral sense, principles, or taste of

dictionary.com

Disgust

noun

  1. A feeling of revulsion or strong disapproval aroused by something unpleasant or offensive.

lexico.com

Disgust

verb

  1. Cause (someone) to feel revulsion or strong disapproval.

lexico.com

Disgust

noun

  1. : marked aversion aroused by something highly distasteful : repugnance wrinkled her nose in disgust his disgust at the way the media has been covering the story

merriam-webster.com

Disgust

verb

  1. : to provoke to loathing, repugnance, or aversion : be offensive to The idea of eating raw meat disgusts him.
  2. : to cause (one) to lose an interest or intention is disgusted by their ignorance
  3. : to cause disgust

merriam-webster.com

Example sentences for Disgust

  1. As the announcement was read, the reaction from the gathered crowd was one of anger and disgust.
  2. The past few years of ugly gridlocked bloodsport politics have driven many Americans out of the arena in disgust.
  3. “Objection,” said defense attorney Patrick Ostronic, wearing a look of disgust.
  4. Reporting it; linking to it; commenting on it; marveling at it; expressing shock and disgust about it.
  5. Disgust at the war in places like Connecticut ran river deep and mountain high.
  6. "Let us give her a rap over the knuckles, and disgust her with the business," said the brothers Cointet.
  7. The process is impossible when there is in the work nothing to attract and something to disgust the vulgar mind.
  8. With a shudder of disgust the lawyer went into the dining room and closed the door into the kitchen.
  9. They had still fifteen paces to go when John Barrow came to a stop with a sniff of disgust.
  10. She soon got tired of trying to cheer me up and quit in disgust.

Related words & Synonyms

sicken, nauseate, repel, revolt, abhorrence, detestation, antipathy, distaste, antipathy, hatred, loathing, dislike, revulsion, disturb, displease, revolt, bother, shock, upset, insult, nauseate, offend, irk, outrage, sicken, disenchant, abhorrence

Nearby words

disgraceful , disgregate , disgruntle , disgruntled , disguise , disgustful , disgusting , dish , dish aerial , dish antenna

Antonyms

delight, relish

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