Theodore Dreiser (August 27, 1871 - December 28, 1945)
Born: 27th August, 1871
Died: 28th December, 1945
Nationality: American
Profession/Occupation: Novelist
Region: Terre Haute, Indiana, Los Angeles, California
Notable works: "The Financier", "Sister Carrie", "An American Tragedy", "Jennie Gerhardt", "The Titan", "The Bulwark", "The Stoic", "The 'Genius' "

Theodore Dreiser Facts

Biography

Theodore Dreiser, (born Aug. 27, 1871, Terre Haute, Ind., U.S.--died Dec. 28, 1945, Hollywood, Calif.), novelist who was the outstanding American practitioner of naturalism. He was the leading figure in a national literary movement that replaced the observance of Victorian notions of propriety with the unflinching presentation of real-life subject matter. Among other themes, his novels explore the new social problems that had arisen in a rapidly industrializing America.

Life

Dreiser was the ninth of 10 surviving children in a family whose perennial poverty forced frequent moves between small Indiana towns and Chicago in search of a lower cost of living. His father, a German immigrant, was a mostly unemployed millworker who subscribed to a stern and narrow Roman Catholicism. His mother's gentle and compassionate outlook sprang from her Czech Mennonite background. In later life Dreiser would bitterly associate religion with his father's ineffectuality and the family's resulting material deprivation, but he always spoke and wrote of his mother with unswerving affection. Dreiser's own harsh experience of poverty as a youth and his early yearnings for wealth and success would become dominant themes in his novels, and the misadventures of his brothers and sisters in early adult life gave him additional material on which to base his characters.

Dreiser's spotty education in parochial and public schools was capped by a year (1889-90) at Indiana University. He began a career as a newspaper reporter in Chicago in 1892 and worked his way to the East Coast. While writing for a Pittsburgh newspaper in 1894, he read works by the scientists T.H. Huxley and John Tyndall and adopted the speculations of the philosopher Herbert Spencer. Through these readings and his own experience, Dreiser came to believe that human beings are helpless in the grip of instincts and social forces beyond their control, and he judged human society as an unequal contest between the strong and the weak. In 1894 Dreiser arrived in New York City, where he worked for several newspapers and contributed to magazines. He married Sara White in 1898, but his roving affections (and resulting infidelities) doomed their relationship. The couple separated permanently in 1912.

Dreiser began writing his first novel, Sister Carrie, in 1899 at the suggestion of a newspaper colleague. Doubleday, Page and Company published it the following year, thanks in large measure to the enthusiasm of that firm's reader, the novelist Frank Norris. But Doubleday's qualms about the book, the story line of which involves a young kept woman whose "immorality" goes unpunished, led the publisher to limit the book's advertising, and consequently it sold fewer than 500 copies. This disappointment and an accumulation of family and marital troubles sent Dreiser into a suicidal depression from which he was rescued in 1901 by his brother, Paul Dresser, a well-known songwriter, who arranged for Theodore's treatment in a sanitarium. Dreiser recovered his spirits, and in the next nine years he achieved notable financial success as an editor in chief of several women's magazines. He was forced to resign in 1910, however, because of an office imbroglio involving his romantic fascination with an assistant's daughter.

Somewhat encouraged by the earlier response to Sister Carrie in England and the novel's republication in America, Dreiser returned to writing fiction. The reception accorded his second novel, Jennie Gerhardt (1911), the story of a woman who submits sexually to rich and powerful men to help her poverty-stricken family, lent him further encouragement. The first two volumes of a projected trilogy of novels based on the life of the American transportation magnate Charles T. Yerkes, The Financier (1912) and The Titan (1914), followed. Dreiser recorded his experiences on a trip to Europe in A Traveler at Forty (1913). In his next major novel, The 'Genius' (1915), he transformed his own life and numerous love affairs into a sprawling semiautobiographical chronicle that was censured by the New York Society for the Suppression of Vice. There ensued 10 years of sustained literary activity during which Dreiser produced a short-story collection, Free and Other Stories (1918); a book of sketches, Twelve Men (1919); philosophical essays, Hey-Rub-a-Dub-Dub (1920); a rhapsodic description of New York, The Color of A Great City (1923); works of drama, including Plays of the Natural and Supernatural (1916) and The Hand of the Potter (1918); and the autobiographical works A Hoosier Holiday (1916) and A Book About Myself (1922).

In 1925 Dreiser's first novel in a decade, An American Tragedy, based on a celebrated murder case, was published. This book brought Dreiser a degree of critical and commercial success he had never before attained and would not thereafter equal. The book's highly critical view of the American legal system also made him the adopted champion of social reformers. He became involved in a variety of causes and slackened his literary production. A visit to the Soviet Union in 1927 produced a skeptical critique of that communist society entitled Dreiser Looks at Russia (1928). His only other significant publications in the late 1920s were collections of stories and sketches written earlier, Chains (1927) and A Gallery of Women (1929), and an unsuccessful collection of poetry, Moods, Cadenced and Declaimed (1926).

The Great Depression of the 1930s ended Dreiser's prosperity and intensified his commitment to social causes. He came to reconsider his opposition to communism and wrote the anticapitalist Tragic America (1931). His only important literary achievement in this decade was the autobiography of his childhood and teens, Dawn (1931), one of the most candid self-revelations by any major writer. In the middle and late '30s his growing social consciousness and his interest in science converged to produce a vaguely mystical philosophy.

In 1938 Dreiser moved from New York to Los Angeles with Helen Richardson, who had been his mistress since 1920. There he set about marketing the film rights to his earlier works. In 1942 he began belatedly to rewrite The Bulwark, a novel begun in 1912. The task was completed in 1944, the same year he married Helen. (Sara White Dreiser had died in 1942.) One of his last acts was to join the American Communist Party. Helen helped him complete most of The Stoic, the long-postponed third volume of his Yerkes trilogy, in the weeks before his death. Both The Bulwark and The Stoic were published posthumously (1946 and 1947, respectively). A collection of Dreiser's philosophical speculations, Notes on Life, appeared in 1974.

Works

Dreiser's first novel, Sister Carrie (1900), is a work of pivotal importance in American literature despite its inauspicious launching. It became a beacon to subsequent American writers whose allegiance was to the realistic treatment of any and all subject matter. Sister Carrie tells the story of a rudderless but pretty small-town girl who comes to the big city filled with vague ambitions. She is used by men and uses them in turn to become a successful Broadway actress while George Hurstwood, the married man who has run away with her, loses his grip on life and descends into beggary and suicide. Sister Carrie was the first masterpiece of the American naturalistic movement in its grittily factual presentation of the vagaries of urban life and in its ingenuous heroine, who goes unpunished for her transgressions against conventional sexual morality. The book's strengths include a brooding but compassionate view of humanity, a memorable cast of characters, and a compelling narrative line. The emotional disintegration of Hurstwood is a much-praised triumph of psychological analysis.

Dreiser's second novel, Jennie Gerhardt (1911), is a lesser achievement than Sister Carrie owing to its heroine's comparative lack of credibility. Based on Dreiser's remembrance of his beloved mother, Jennie emerges as a plaster saint with whom most modern readers find it difficult to empathize. The novel's strengths include stinging characterizations of social snobs and narrow "religionists," as well as a deep sympathy for the poor.

The Financier (1912) and The Titan (1914) are the first two novels of a trilogy dealing with the career of the late-19th century American financier and traction tycoon Charles T. Yerkes, who is cast in fictionalized form as Frank Cowperwood. As Cowperwood successfully plots monopolistic business coups first in Philadelphia and then in Chicago, the focus of the novels alternates between his amoral business dealings and his marital and other erotic relations. The Financier and The Titan are important examples of the business novel and represent probably the most meticulously researched and documented studies of high finance in first-rate fiction. Cowperwood, like all of Dreiser's major characters, remains unfulfilled despite achieving most of his apparent wishes. The third novel in the trilogy, The Stoic (1947), is fatally weakened by Dreiser's diminished interest in his protagonist.

The 'Genius' (1915) is artistically one of Dreiser's least successful novels but is nonetheless indispensable to an understanding of his psychology. This book chronicles its autobiographical hero's career as an artist and his unpredictable pursuit of the perfect woman as a source of ultimate fulfillment.

Dreiser's longest novel, An American Tragedy (1925), is a complex and compassionate account of the life and death of a young antihero named Clyde Griffiths. The novel begins with Clyde's blighted background, recounts his path to success, and culminates in his apprehension, trial, and execution for murder. The book was called by one influential critic "the worst-written great novel in the world," but its questionable grammar and style are transcended by its narrative power. Dreiser's labyrinthine speculations on the extent of Clyde's guilt do not blunt his searing indictment of materialism and the American dream of success.

Dreiser's next-to-last novel, The Bulwark (1946), is the story of a Quaker father's unavailing struggle to shield his children from the materialism of modern American life. More intellectually consistent than Dreiser's earlier novels, this book also boasts some of his most polished prose.

Legacy

Dreiser's considerable stature, beyond his historic importance as a pioneer of unvarnished truth-telling in modern literature, is due almost entirely to his achievements as a novelist. His sprawling imagination and cumbersome style kept him from performing well in the smaller literary forms, and his nonfiction writing, especially his essays, are marred by intellectual inconsistency, a lack of objectivity, and even bitterness. But these latter traits are much less obtrusive in his novels, where his compassion and empathy for human striving make his best work moving and memorable. The long novel gave Dreiser the prime form through which to explore in depth the possibilities of 20th-century American life, with its material profusion and spiritual doubt. Dreiser's characters struggle for self-realization in the face of society's narrow and repressive moral conventions, and they often obtain material success and erotic gratification while a more enduring spiritual satisfaction eludes them. Despite Dreiser's alleged deficiencies as a stylist, his novels succeed in their accumulation of realistic detail and in the power and integrity with which they delineate the tragic aspects of the American pursuit of worldly success. Sister Carrie and An American Tragedy are certainly enduring works of literature that display a deep understanding of the American experience around the turn of the century, with its expansive desires and pervasive disillusionments.

Top 8 Theodore Dreiser quotes

Art is the stored honey of the human soul, gathered on wings of misery and travail.
Art
Gathered
Honey
Human
Human soul
Misery
Soul
Stored
Wings
Words are but the vague shadows of the volumes we mean. Little audible links, they are, chaining together great inaudible feelings and purposes.
Feelings
Great
Links
Little
Mean
Purposes
Shadows
Together
Vague
Volumes
Words
In order to have wisdom we must have ignorance.
Ignorance
Must
Wisdom
Nothing is proved, all is permitted.
Nothing
Permitted
Proved
Let no one underestimate the need of pity. We live in a stony universe whose hard, brilliant forces rage fiercely.
Brilliant
Fiercely
Forces
Hard
Live
Need
No-one
Pity
Rage
Underestimate
Universe
Whose
I believe in the compelling power of love. I do not understand it. I believe it to be the most fragrant blossom of all this thorny existence.
Believe
Blossom
Compelling
Existence
Fragrant
I believe
I believe in
Love
Most
Power
Understand
Assure a man that he has a soul and then frighten him with old wives' tales as to what is to become of him afterward, and you have hooked a fish, a mental slave.
Afterwards
Assure
Become
Fish
Frighten
He
Him
Hooked
Man
Mental
Old
Slave
Soul
Tales
Our civilization is still in a middle stage, scarcely beast, in that it is no longer wholly guided by instinct; scarcely human, in that it is not yet wholly guided by reason.
Beast
Civilization
Guided
Human
Instinct
Longer
Middle
Our
Reason
Scarcely
Stage
Still
Wholly

Theodore Dreiser essays

Read more informative topics on our blog
Modern American Life And Sister Carrie British Literature Essay
Theodore Dreiser is one of the most controversial figures in American literary history. Sister Carrie, Dreiser's first novel, and one of is own first works of fiction, is universally recognized as a major American book. Dreiser's controversy with Doubleday, Web page and Company within the publication of Sister Carrie is one of the most frequent noted situations in North american literary history and the topic that spurred into a deeper research of the trouble. Being written under the pressure of his friend Arthur Henry, Sister Carrie was to become symbol of a fresh era in writing fiction...
Realism Naturalism English
Realism and Naturalism are two similar literary motions of the 19th and 20th century that offer with the real, cruel world. Realism originated in the early 1800s as a branch off of Romanticism which also handled common, "natural" life. Realism most straightforwardly is "the truthful treatment of materials. " Authors in this motion concentrated mainly on everyday, natural situations involving typical people, nothing at all too extreme or unusual. This movements put most focus on detached, precise observations of individuals life. Some such writers were Symbol Twain and Dean Howells. Naturalism..
The Lost Phoebe Analysis
Keywords: the lost pheobe, the lost pheobe summary In the storyline of this Lost Phoebe, Theodore Dreiser creates a story about a man and his better half. Dreiser tells much about the man's youth and early on adulthood because he was showing the audience how Henry Reifsneider was doomed to suffer in isolation at the end of his life. The man, Henry Reifsneider, possessed resided with someone all his life. He resided with his parents until he dropped in love. When Henry dropped in love, and made a decision to get committed, his parents asked his bride-to-be to reside with him. Henry hitched Phoebe..
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