Robert Frost (March 26, 1874 - January 29, 1963)
Born: 26th March, 1874
Died: 29th January, 1963
Nationality: American
Profession/Occupation: Poet
Region: San Francisco, California, Boston, Massachusetts
Notable works: poet laureate

Robert Frost Facts

Biography

Robert Frost, in full Robert Lee Frost, (born March 26, 1874, San Francisco, California, U.S.--died January 29, 1963, Boston, Massachusetts), American poet who was much admired for his depictions of the rural life of New England, his command of American colloquial speech, and his realistic verse portraying ordinary people in everyday situations.

Life

Frost's father, William Prescott Frost, Jr., was a journalist with ambitions of establishing a career in California, and in 1873 he and his wife moved to San Francisco. Her husband's untimely death from tuberculosis in 1885 prompted Isabelle Moodie Frost to take her two children, Robert and Jeanie, to Lawrence, Massachusetts, where they were taken in by the children's paternal grandparents. While their mother taught at a variety of schools in New Hampshire and Massachusetts, Robert and Jeanie grew up in Lawrence, and Robert graduated from high school in 1892. A top student in his class, he shared valedictorian honours with Elinor White, with whom he had already fallen in love.

Robert and Elinor shared a deep interest in poetry, but their continued education sent Robert to Dartmouth College and Elinor to St. Lawrence University. Meanwhile, Robert continued to labour on the poetic career he had begun in a small way during high school; he first achieved professional publication in 1894 when The Independent, a weekly literary journal, printed his poem "My Butterfly: An Elegy." Impatient with academic routine, Frost left Dartmouth after less than a year. He and Elinor married in 1895 but found life difficult, and the young poet supported them by teaching school and farming, neither with notable success. During the next dozen years, six children were born, two of whom died early, leaving a family of one son and three daughters. Frost resumed his college education at Harvard University in 1897 but left after two years' study there. From 1900 to 1909 the family raised poultry on a farm near Derry, New Hampshire, and for a time Frost also taught at the Pinkerton Academy in Derry. Frost became an enthusiastic botanist and acquired his poetic persona of a New England rural sage during the years he and his family spent at Derry. All this while he was writing poems, but publishing outlets showed little interest in them.

By 1911 Frost was fighting against discouragement. Poetry had always been considered a young person's game, but Frost, who was nearly 40 years old, had not published a single book of poems and had seen just a handful appear in magazines. In 1911 ownership of the Derry farm passed to Frost. A momentous decision was made: to sell the farm and use the proceeds to make a radical new start in London, where publishers were perceived to be more receptive to new talent. Accordingly, in August 1912 the Frost family sailed across the Atlantic to England. Frost carried with him sheaves of verses he had written but not gotten into print. English publishers in London did indeed prove more receptive to innovative verse, and, through his own vigorous efforts and those of the expatriate American poet Ezra Pound, Frost within a year had published A Boy's Will (1913). From this first book, such poems as "Storm Fear," "The Tuft of Flowers," and "Mowing" became standard anthology pieces.

A Boy's Will was followed in 1914 by a second collection, North of Boston, that introduced some of the most popular poems in all of Frost's work, among them "Mending Wall," "The Death of the Hired Man," "Home Burial," and "After Apple-Picking." In London, Frost's name was frequently mentioned by those who followed the course of modern literature, and soon American visitors were returning home with news of this unknown poet who was causing a sensation abroad. The Boston poet Amy Lowell traveled to England in 1914, and in the bookstores there she encountered Frost's work. Taking his books home to America, Lowell then began a campaign to locate an American publisher for them, meanwhile writing her own laudatory review of North of Boston.

Without his being fully aware of it, Frost was on his way to fame. The outbreak of World War I brought the Frosts back to the United States in 1915. By then Amy Lowell's review had already appeared in The New Republic, and writers and publishers throughout the Northeast were aware that a writer of unusual abilities stood in their midst. The American publishing house of Henry Holt had brought out its edition of North of Boston in 1914. It became a best-seller, and, by the time the Frost family landed in Boston, Holt was adding the American edition of A Boy's Will. Frost soon found himself besieged by magazines seeking to publish his poems. Never before had an American poet achieved such rapid fame after such a disheartening delay. From this moment his career rose on an ascending curve.

Frost bought a small farm at Franconia, New Hampshire, in 1915, but his income from both poetry and farming proved inadequate to support his family, and so he lectured and taught part-time at Amherst College and at the University of Michigan from 1916 to 1938. Any remaining doubt about his poetic abilities was dispelled by the collection Mountain Interval (1916), which continued the high level established by his first books. His reputation was further enhanced by New Hampshire (1923), which received the Pulitzer Prize for poetry. That prize was also awarded to Frost's Collected Poems (1930) and to the collections A Further Range (1936) and A Witness Tree (1942). His other poetry volumes include West-Running Brook (1928), Steeple Bush (1947), and In the Clearing (1962). Frost served as a poet-in-residence at Harvard (1939-43), Dartmouth (1943-49), and Amherst College (1949-63), and in his old age he gathered honours and awards from every quarter. He was the poetry consultant to the Library of Congress (1958-59; the post was later styled poet laureate consultant in poetry), and his recital of his poem "The Gift Outright" at the inauguration of President John F. Kennedy in 1961 was a memorable occasion .

Works

The poems in Frost's early books, especially North of Boston, differ radically from late 19th-century Romantic verse with its ever-benign view of nature, its didactic emphasis, and its slavish conformity to established verse forms and themes. Lowell called North of Boston a "sad" book, referring to its portraits of inbred, isolated, and psychologically troubled rural New Englanders. These off-mainstream portraits signaled Frost's departure from the old tradition and his own fresh interest in delineating New England characters and their formative background. Among these psychological investigations are the alienated life of Silas in "The Death of the Hired Man," the inability of Amy in "Home Burial" to walk the difficult path from grief back to normality, the rigid mindset of the neighbour in "Mending Wall," and the paralyzing fear that twists the personality of Doctor Magoon in "A Hundred Collars."

The natural world, for Frost, wore two faces. Early on he overturned the Emersonian concept of nature as healer and mentor in a poem in A Boy's Will entitled "Storm Fear," a grim picture of a blizzard as a raging beast that dares the inhabitants of an isolated house to come outside and be killed. Later, in such poems as "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" and "The Hill Wife," the benign surface of nature cloaks potential dangers, and death itself lurks behind dark, mysterious trees. Nature's frolicsome aspect predominates in other poems such as "Birches," where a destructive ice storm is recalled as a thing of memorable beauty. Although Frost is known to many as essentially a "happy" poet, the tragic elements in life continued to mark his poems, from "'Out, Out--'" (1916), in which a lad's hand is severed and life ended, to a fine verse entitled "The Fear of Man" from Steeple Bush, in which human release from pervading fear is contained in the image of a breathless dash through the nighttime city from the security of one faint street lamp to another just as faint. Even in his final volume, In the Clearing, so filled with the stubborn courage of old age, Frost portrays human security as a rather tiny and quite vulnerable opening in a thickly grown forest, a pinpoint of light against which the encroaching trees cast their very real threat of darkness.

Frost demonstrated an enviable versatility of theme, but he most commonly investigated human contacts with the natural world in small encounters that serve as metaphors for larger aspects of the human condition. He often portrayed the human ability to turn even the slightest incident or natural detail to emotional profit, seen at its most economical form in "Dust of Snow":

Other poems are portraits of the introspective mind possessed by its own private demons, as in "Desert Places," which could serve to illustrate Frost's celebrated definition of poetry as a "momentary stay against confusion":

Frost was widely admired for his mastery of metrical form, which he often set against the natural rhythms of everyday, unadorned speech. In this way the traditional stanza and metrical line achieved new vigour in his hands. Frost's command of traditional metrics is evident in the tight, older, prescribed patterns of such sonnets as "Design" and "The Silken Tent." His strongest allegiance probably was to the quatrain with simple rhymes such as abab and abcb, and within its restrictions he was able to achieve an infinite variety, as in the aforementioned "Dust of Snow" and "Desert Places." Frost was never an enthusiast of free verse and regarded its looseness as something less than ideal, similar to playing tennis without a net. His determination to be "new" but to employ "old ways to be new" set him aside from the radical experimentalism of the advocates of vers libre in the early 20th century. On occasion Frost did employ free verse to advantage, one outstanding example being "After Apple-Picking," with its random pattern of long and short lines and its nontraditional use of rhyme. Here he shows his power to stand as a transitional figure between the old and the new in poetry. Frost mastered blank verse (i.e., unrhymed verse in iambic pentameter) for use in such dramatic narratives as "Mending Wall" and "Home Burial," becoming one of the few modern poets to use it both appropriately and well. His chief technical innovation in these dramatic-dialogue poems was to unify the regular pentameter line with the irregular rhythms of conversational speech. Frost's blank verse has the same terseness and concision that mark his poetry in general.

Legacy

Frost was the most widely admired and highly honoured American poet of the 20th century. Amy Lowell thought he had overstressed the dark aspects of New England life, but Frost's later flood of more uniformly optimistic verses made that view seem antiquated. Louis Untermeyer's judgment that the dramatic poems in North of Boston were the most authentic and powerful of their kind ever produced by an American has only been confirmed by later opinions. Gradually, Frost's name ceased to be linked solely with New England, and he gained broad acceptance as a national poet.

It is true that certain criticisms of Frost have never been wholly refuted, one being that he was overly interested in the past, another that he was too little concerned with the present and future of American society. Those who criticize Frost's detachment from the "modern" emphasize the undeniable absence in his poems of meaningful references to the modern realities of industrialization, urbanization, and the concentration of wealth, or to such familiar items as radios, motion pictures, automobiles, factories, or skyscrapers. The poet has been viewed as a singer of sweet nostalgia and a social and political conservative who was content to sigh for the good things of the past.

Such views have failed to gain general acceptance, however, in the face of the universality of Frost's themes, the emotional authenticity of his voice, and the austere technical brilliance of his verse. Frost was often able to endow his rural imagery with a larger symbolic or metaphysical significance, and his best poems transcend the immediate realities of their subject matter to illuminate the unique blend of tragic endurance, stoicism, and tenacious affirmation that marked his outlook on life. Over his long career, Frost succeeded in lodging more than a few poems where, as he put it, they would be "hard to get rid of," among them "The Road Not Taken" (published in 1915, with its meaning disputed ever since). He can be said to have lodged himself just as solidly in the affections of his fellow Americans. For thousands he remains the only recent poet worth reading and the only one who matters.

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Top 101 Robert Frost quotes

Two roads diverged in a wood and I - I took the one less traveled by, and that has made all the difference.
All the difference
Difference
Less
Made
Roads
Took
Traveled
Two
Wood
Poetry is when an emotion has found its thought and the thought has found words.
Emotion
Found
Poetry
Thought
Words
In three words I can sum up everything I've learned about life: it goes on.
About
Everything
Goes
I can
Learned
Life
Sum
Three
Up
Words
Two such as you with such a master speed, cannot be parted nor be swept away, from one another once you are agreed, that life is only life forevermore, together wing to wing and oar to oar.
Agreed
Another
Away
Cannot
Life
Master
Nor
Once
Only
Parted
Speed
Swept
Together
Two
Half the world is composed of people who have something to say and can't, and the other half who have nothing to say and keep on saying it.
Composed
Half
Keep
Nothing
Other
People
Say
Saying
Something
Who
World
Don't ever take a fence down until you know why it was put up.
Down
Ever
Fence
Know
Put
Take
Until
Up
Why
You
You can be a little ungrammatical if you come from the right part of the country.
Come
Country
Little
Part
Right
You
Home is the place where, when you have to go there, they have to take you in.
Go
Home
Place
Take
Where
You
The brain is a wonderful organ; it starts working the moment you get up in the morning and does not stop until you get into the office.
Brain
Does
Get
Moment
Morning
Office
Organ
Starts
Stop
Until
Up
Wonderful
Working
You
The best way out is always through.
Always
Best
Best way
Out
Through
Way
Education is the ability to listen to almost anything without losing your temper or your self-confidence.
Ability
Almost
Almost anything
Anything
Education
Listen
Losing
Self-confidence
Temper
Without
Your
A jury consists of twelve persons chosen to decide who has the better lawyer.
Better
Chosen
Consists
Decide
Jury
Lawyer
Persons
Twelve
Who
Poetry is what gets lost in translation.
Gets
Lost
Poetry
Translation
Hell is a half-filled auditorium.
Auditorium
Hell
Hell is
A person will sometimes devote all his life to the development of one part of his body - the wishbone.
Body
Development
Devote
His
Life
Part
Person
Sometimes
Will
Happiness makes up in height for what it lacks in length.
Happiness
Height
Lacks
Length
Makes
Up
By working faithfully eight hours a day you may eventually get to be boss and work twelve hours a day.
Boss
Day
Eight
Eventually
Faithfully
Get
Hours
May
Twelve
Work
Working
You
It's a funny thing that when a man hasn't anything on earth to worry about, he goes off and gets married.
About
Anything
Earth
Funny
Funny thing
Gets
Goes
He
Man
Married
Off
Thing
Worry
A poem begins in delight and ends in wisdom.
Begins
Delight
Ends
Poem
Wisdom
To be a poet is a condition, not a profession.
Condition
Poet
Profession
A diplomat is a man who always remembers a woman's birthday but never remembers her age.
Age
Always
Birthday
Diplomat
Her
Man
Never
Remembers
Who
Woman
Forgive, O Lord, my little jokes on Thee, and I'll forgive Thy great big joke on me.
Big
Forgive
Great
Joke
Jokes
Little
Lord
Me
Thee
Thy
I hold it to be the inalienable right of anybody to go to hell in his own way.
Anybody
Go
Go to hell
Hell
His
Hold
Inalienable
Inalienable right
Own
Right
Way
No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader. No surprise in the writer, no surprise in the reader.
Reader
Surprise
Tears
Writer
Style is that which indicates how the writer takes himself and what he is saying. It is the mind skating circles around itself as it moves forward.
Around
Circles
Forward
He
Himself
How
Itself
Mind
Moves
Saying
Skating
Style
Takes
Which
Talking is a hydrant in the yard and writing is a faucet upstairs in the house. Opening the first takes the pressure off the second.
First
House
Hydrant
Off
Opening
Pressure
Second
Takes
Talking
Upstairs
Writing
Yard
Poetry is a way of taking life by the throat.
Life
Poetry
Taking
Throat
Way
I am a writer of books in retrospect. I talk in order to understand; I teach in order to learn.
Am
Books
I am
Learn
Order
Retrospect
Talk
Teach
Understand
Writer
Humor is the most engaging cowardice.
Cowardice
Engaging
Humor
Most
A poet never takes notes. You never take notes in a love affair.
Affair
Love
Love affair
Never
Never take
Notes
Poet
Take
Takes
You
Take care to sell your horse before he dies. The art of life is passing losses on.
Art
Before
Care
Dies
He
Horse
Life
Losses
Passing
Sell
Take
Take care
Your
Education doesn't change life much. It just lifts trouble to a higher plane of regard.
Change
Education
Higher
Higher plane
Just
Life
Lifts
Much
Plane
Regard
Trouble
You don't have to deserve your mother's love. You have to deserve your father's.
Deserve
Father
Love
Love you
Mother
You
Your
The father is always a Republican toward his son, and his mother's always a Democrat.
Always
Democrat
Father
His
Mother
Republican
Son
Toward
The greatest thing in family life is to take a hint when a hint is intended-and not to take a hint when a hint isn't intended.
Family
Family life
Greatest
Greatest thing
Hint
Intended
Life
Take
Thing
I'm not confused. I'm just well mixed.
Confused
Just
Mixed
Well
You have freedom when you're easy in your harness.
Easy
Freedom
Harness
You
Your
A civilized society is one which tolerates eccentricity to the point of doubtful sanity.
Civilized
Civilized society
Doubtful
Eccentricity
Point
Sanity
Society
Which
Thinking isn't agreeing or disagreeing. That's voting.
Agreeing
Thinking
Voting
I'd just as soon play tennis with the net down.
Down
Just
Net
Play
Soon
Tennis
Modern poets talk against business, poor things, but all of us write for money. Beginners are subjected to trial by market.
Against
Beginners
Business
Market
Modern
Money
Poets
Poor
Subjected
Talk
Things
Trial
Us
Write
Poets are like baseball pitchers. Both have their moments. The intervals are the tough things.
Baseball
Both
Intervals
Like
Moments
Pitchers
Poets
Things
Tough
I alone of English writers have consciously set myself to make music out of what I may call the sound of sense.
Alone
Call
English
Make
May
Music
Myself
Out
Sense
Set
Sound
Writers
The ear is the only true writer and the only true reader.
Ear
Only
Reader
True
Writer
They would not find me changed from him they knew - only more sure of all I thought was true.
Changed
Find
Him
Knew
Me
More
Only
Sure
Thought
True
Would
Nobody was ever meant, To remember or invent, What he did with every cent.
Cent
Did
Ever
Every
He
Invent
Meant
Nobody
Remember
Being the boss anywhere is lonely. Being a female boss in a world of mostly men is especially so.
Anywhere
Being
Boss
Female
Lonely
Men
Mostly
World
The strongest and most effective force in guaranteeing the long-term maintenance of power is not violence in all the forms deployed by the dominant to control the dominated, but consent in all the forms in which the dominated acquiesce in their own domination.
Acquiesce
Consent
Control
Deployed
Dominant
Dominated
Domination
Effective
Force
Forms
Long-term
Maintenance
Most
Own
The worst disease which can afflict executives in their work is not, as popularly supposed, alcoholism; it's egotism.
Afflict
Disease
Egotism
Executives
Supposed
Which
Work
Worst
The reason why worry kills more people than work is that more people worry than work.
More
More people
People
Reason
Than
Why
Work
Worry

Robert Frost essays

Read more informative topics on our blog
Analysis Of 'After Apple Picking'
Robert Frost is probably among the best poets in the annals of the world. He was raised in rural New Britain and started writing poetry early in his life. Frost's poetry is laced with imagery and fraught with sadness, probably due to depression and stress and anxiety that plagued him throughout his life. He previously been writing for quite a while when he published After Apple Picking in 1914. On the surface, it is approximately being worn out after gathering a harvest of apples, but it actually provides much deeper so this means. People have many different ideas on the actual poem is actually about,..
Characteristics Of Creative People Idea Essay
Nearly everybody gets the characteristics of a poet. Whether we are aware of our role or we do not believe in it. People have an inbuilt potential to be creative. A continuous creativity runs from being just creative to a point to be very creative. A fortunate note about creativeness is an individual can become more creative by just experiencing creative individuals and then imitating them. Freelance writers and artists and also other creative types may actually have similar features. This paper will discuss a few of the individual traits that seem to be to be peculiar and eccentric out there. When..
Comparison Of Apparently With No Delight English Literature Essay
Emily Dickinson's "Evidently with No Delight" Emily discussions of mother nature bounties well streamed with the school of thought of life. She says about a bloom which is in full bloom at one point of your energy but is ruined as the winters solutions. The sun which plays its daily role is not damaged, the moment flower falls, as it is busy and must rise the next day. Emily Dickenson's emphasizes the discipline accompanied by the type in its might as it has to follow what God wishes and approves. Whatever plight involves any of His creations, he's the one to oversee their life pattern. The sun eats..
King Lear Essay
In keeping with the ancient theory of tragedy, evoking pity and fear in the audience, King Lear motivates us to feel deeply for the protagonist. Injustice, betrayal and dishonor are common in stories about Royalty and the ups and downs of their charmed lives. A well-researched king lear essay could only look at an aspect or two of the multi-faceted story through five acts in a towering drama structure that grabs the attention with powerful poetry and tremendous storytelling. Writing the king lear essay may well be the ultimate achievement. A literary essay would suit the dedicated student of..
Robert Frost: Evaluation of Symbolism
Robert Frost's poems take the minds of his readers through journeys of every experience imaginable. Frost, whose qualifications was heavily influenced by New Britain, uses his previous encounters to weave sensitive threads of poetry. In his poems he uses delicate types of symbolism to convey a deeper primary so this means to his original words. In addition, his sense of rustic, pastoral styles lets almost every reader with any kind of background relate with his words. In two of Robert Frost's poems, "Desert Places, " and "I Ended by the Woods on a Snowy Nighttime, " he demonstrates these uses of..
Robert Frost Figurative Language And Symbolism English Literature Essay
He begins by saying She is as in a field a silken tent on line 1. The tent this is a metaphor for a woman or women in general, whilst the field where it is defined perhaps represents society and her family. The woman is a 'silken tent', silken here suggests femininity as opposed to the rough canvas of other such tents. The centre pole symbolises the soul of the woman, whilst her personality is represented by the capricious breeze that causes the tent to go and sway, reflecting her limited freedom. Just like a tent, a woman also has strong support inside of her, being her spirit, which includes constraints..
The Outsiders Movie Review Essay
Keywords: the outsiders research, the outsiders research essay The Outsiders movie is dependant on a book compiled by S. E Hinton. The storyline takes place in Oklahoma in the 1960's. It is about two gangs or public classes known as the 'greasers' and the 'socs'. The greasers are the poor ones who live on the east area of town and the socs will be the rich ones living on the western part of town. The socs enjoy going to the east side to beat up greasers. The primary persona is Ponyboy Curtis, an orphan coping with his two older brothers. One evening, after a fight at home Ponyboy and his friend Johnny Cade..
Themes In After Apple Picking English Literature Essay
Robert Frost said, "A poem commences in joy and ends in knowledge" ("Robert Frost Quotes"). This is a idea of Frost that he placed into the creation of After Apple-Picking. The title After Apple-Picking illustrates that the poem is of a dying man who is looking back on his life, displayed by apple picking, and of his regret for unaccomplished wants. The old man only needs that he could do more before he dies, wanting it could give meaning to his life. Robert Frost uses shade, tempo and diction, and figurative language to build up the theme of life's wishes and significance around. The tone of After..
Response to Robert Frost's "Education by poetry" Essay
In the address Education by Poems given in Amherst School in 1930, Robert Frost introduces the 2 roles of poetry in education. The first position is that through poetry all of us cultivate our taste. The 2nd role, which is said to be more crucial, is that poetry instructs us how you can discern and understand metaphor in our life. Having read that poetry will help us with our handling metaphor, I the natural way reached one easy question. Why is it important to provide an ability to discover and understand metaphor in our life?In the next paragraph, I would like to provide my answer to this extremely question,..
Robert Frost as a Modernist Poet Essay
Robert Frost: Present day poet Regardless of the Pastoral element that was predominant in all of Robert Frost's poems, he was still regarded a modern poet because the poetry that this individual wrote was well endowed with the many problems that males who lived in the modern world facing Science and Technology. Having been a contemporary and great good friend to this sort of modernist greats as Ezra Pound and Wallace Dahon. Although this individual resembled these kinds of modernist poets, Frost was quite different in the rest of the modern poets of his period.The modern portions of his beautifully..
Loneliness And The Prevalence Simply by Frost And Dickinson Dissertation
Beautifully constructed wording is an aesthetic sort of literature that enriches and enhances the that means of writing. In beautifully constructed wording, there is frequently analytical dialogue about what the author's meaning and goal for his or her writing. To fully understand the text, it is sometimes helpful to browse another poem of a similar theme. This can be can be seen once reading Robert Frost is "Desert Places" (759) and Emily Dickinson 's "I felt a Funeral, in my Brain" (726) together. The two poems make use of setting to define the theme of seclusion..
"Mending Wall" by Robert Frost Essay
Since god knows when mankind finds that harmony and togetherness are more beneficial to the whole of the group than dissonance and separation. Once society performs together together, it reaches the desired aim more rapidly and efficiently. The best goal can simply be come to after dissimilarities have been overcome, and assistance has took place. All of these functions are plainly identified in the poem "Mending Wall" by simply Robert Frost. He uses the wall structure as a long metaphor to reveal the narrator's thoughts regarding overcoming variations, cooperation, and..
Resource of Robert Lee Ice Essay
Biography of Robert Shelter FrostBiography of Robert Lee Ice"A poem begins which has a lump inside the throat, a home-sickness or a love-sickness. It is just a reaching-out toward expression; an effort to find completion. A complete poem is one where an emotion finds its thought and the thought has found the words" Robert Lee Frost once stated. Robert Frost is broadly admired and recognized to get his literary works. Having been an privileged poet from the twentieth hundred years. Frost might have existed a worrying life, although that under no circumstances seemed to interfere with..
Robert Frost
Robert Frost was developed on March 26, 1874. His parents were Isabel Moodie and William Prescott Frost, Junior (Bio). His father was a drinker and a bettor, which upset the whole family. On June 25, 1876, Robert's sister Jeannie was born (Bio). In 1879, Frost entered kindergarten nevertheless , came home because of stressed stomach soreness and would not return after. The next year, he tried out going to the initial grade, but dropped out again. Exactly the same thing happened another year from then on. He was house schooled.In 1885 his father passed away (Bio). He died of tuberculosis on,..
A great Analysis Of ' Practically nothing Gold Can Stay ' Essay
In T. D. Salinger's The Heurter in the Rye and Robert Frost's "Nothing Gold May Stay, " symbols present the reoccurring theme that change is usually inevitable. In general, change can be something that cannot be averted because it is imminent. Along with icons, the portrayal in The Baseball catchers in the Rye and placing in "Nothing Gold May Stay, " reveal this theme.The icons in The Heurter in the Rye and "Nothing Gold May Stay" prove that change can not be avoided. The Catcher in the Rye offers important symbols that show change truly does occur, no..
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Thomas Carlyle, (born December 4, 1795, Ecclefechan, Dumfriesshire, Scotland--died February..
Federico Garcia Lorca
Federico Garcia Lorca
Federico Garcia Lorca, (born June 5, 1898, Fuente Vaqueros, Granada province, Spain--died August..
Christopher Marlowe
Christopher Marlowe
Christopher Marlowe, (baptized Feb. 26, 1564, Canterbury, Kent, Eng.--died May 30, 1593, Deptford,..
Edgar Allan Poe
Edgar Allan Poe
Edgar Allan Poe, (born January 19, 1809, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.--died October 7, 1849, Baltimore,..
Alfred Stieglitz
Alfred Stieglitz
Alfred Stieglitz, (born January 1, 1864, Hoboken, New Jersey, U.S.--died July 13, 1946, New York,..
St. Jerome
St. Jerome
St. Jerome, Latin in full Eusebius Hieronymus, pseudonym Sophronius, (born c. 347, Stridon, Dalmatia--died..
Ernest Hemingway
Ernest Hemingway
Ernest Hemingway, in full Ernest Miller Hemingway, (born July 21, 1899, Cicero [now in Oak Park],..
Helmuth von Moltke
Helmuth von Moltke
Helmuth von Moltke, in full Helmuth Karl Bernhard, Count (graf) von Moltke, (born October 26, 1800,..