Robert Dale Owen (November 09, 1801 - June 24, 1877)
Born: 9th November, 1801
Died: 24th June, 1877
Nationality: Scottish
Profession/Occupation: Politician
Region: Glasgow, Scotland, Lake George, New York
Notable works: House of Representatives, United States

Robert Dale Owen Facts

Biography

Robert Dale Owen, (born Nov. 9, 1801, Glasgow, Scot.--died June 24, 1877, Lake George, N.Y., U.S.), American social reformer and politician. The son of the English reformer Robert Owen, Robert Dale Owen was steeped in his father's socialist philosophy while growing up at New Lanark in Scotland--the elder Owen's model industrial community. In 1825 father and son immigrated to the United States to set up another self-sufficient socialist community at New Harmony, Ind.

Robert Dale Owen edited the community's newspaper, the New Harmony Gazette, until 1827, when he became associated with the controversial reformer Fanny Wright. They traveled together to Wright's experimental community of Nashoba, Tenn., which was dedicated to the education and gradual emancipation of slaves, and from there went on to Europe.

Upon returning to the United States, Owen and Wright revisited the Nashoba and New Harmony communities, then in a state of decay. They settled in New York, where Owen edited the Free Enquirer. The paper opposed evangelical religion and advocated more liberal divorce laws, more equal distribution of wealth, and widespread industrial education; it was at the centre of radical free thought in New York. For two years, Owen, with Wright and other radicals, sought to turn the New York Workingmen's Party away from Thomas Skidmore's belief in an equal division of property. They successfully ousted Skidmore, but later their own program of social reform through public education was also repudiated.

After a brief trip to England in 1832, Owen returned to New Harmony. He served three terms in the Indiana legislature (1836-1838), where he advocated the allocation of government funds for public schools, and two terms in the U.S. House of Representatives, where he introduced the bill creating the Smithsonian Institution.

Owen was defeated for a third term in Congress and went back to Indiana, where he advocated property rights for married women and liberalization of divorce laws. Appointed charge d'affaires at Naples in 1853 and minister to Italy in 1855, Owen spent much of the 1850s abroad. Upon his return in 1858, he became an outspoken proponent of emancipation; at the outbreak of the American Civil War, he urged an end to slavery in a letter to President Lincoln, a letter that Secretary of the Treasury Salmon Chase said greatly influenced the president.

In 1863 Owen headed a committee to investigate the condition of the freedmen and wrote a book on his findings, The Wrong of Slavery (1864). In it he surprised many people by counseling a 10-year delay in granting the newly emancipated slaves the right to vote.

Owen spent his final years writing a novel (Beyond the Breakers, 1870) and his autobiography (Threading My Way, 1874).

Top 23 Robert Dale Owen quotes

After voluntary exertions on the part of our people to which the history of the world furnishes no parallel, is the old root of bitterness still to remain in the ground, to sprout and bear fruit in the future as it has borne fruit in the past?
After
Bear
Bitterness
Borne
Fruit
Future
Ground
History
In the past
Old
Our
Our people
Parallel
Part
And I hereby distinctly and emphatically declare that I consider myself, and earnestly desire to be considered by others, as utterly divested, now and during the rest of my life, of any such rights, the barbarous relics of a feudal, despotic system.
Any
Consider
Considered
Declare
Desire
Despotic
Earnestly
Feudal
Life
My life
Myself
Now
Others
Relic
Boldness and decision command, often even in evil, the respect and concurrence of mankind.
Boldness
Command
Decision
Even
Evil
Mankind
Often
Respect
Can you look forward to the future of our country and imagine any state of things in which, with slavery still existing, we should be assured of permanent peace? I cannot.
Any
Assured
Cannot
Country
Existing
Forward
Future
Imagine
Look
Our
Peace
Permanent
Permanent peace
Should
Fulfill - you can far more than fulfill - the brightest anticipations of those who, in the name of human freedom, and in the face of threats that have ripened into terrible realities since, fought that battle which placed you where you now stand.
Battle
Brightest
Face
Far
Fought
Freedom
Fulfill
Human
Human freedom
More
Name
Now
Placed
Realities
In days when the public safety is imminently threatened, and the fate of a nation may hang upon a single act, we owe frank speech, above all other men, to him who is highest in authority. I shall speak to you as man to man.
Above
Act
Authority
Days
Fate
Frank
Hang
Highest
Him
Man
May
Men
Nation
Other
In the due exercise of your official power, in strictest accordance with law and the Constitution, you can deprive the enemy of that which, above all else, has given, and still gives him, aid and comfort.
Above
Accordance
Aid
Comfort
Constitution
Deprive
Due
Else
Enemy
Exercise
Given
Gives
Him
Law
It has always been a great wrong that these men and their families should be held in bondage.
Always
Been
Bondage
Families
Great
Held
Men
Should
Wrong
It is idle to await unanimity.
Idle
It is within your power at this very moment not only to consumate an act of enlightened statesmanship, but, as the instrument of the Almighty, to restore to freedom a race of men.
Act
Almighty
Enlightened
Freedom
Instrument
Men
Moment
Only
Power
Race
Restore
Statesmanship
Very
Within
Men acquiesce in a thousand things, once righteously and boldly done, to which, if proposed to them in advance, they might find endless objections.
Acquiesce
Advance
Boldly
Done
Endless
Find
Men
Might
Objections
Once
Proposed
Them
Things
Thousand
Men ever follow willingly a daring leader: most willingly of all, in great emergencies.
Daring
Emergencies
Ever
Follow
Great
Leader
Men
Most
Willingly
Of the unjust rights which in virtue of this ceremony an iniquitous law gives me over the person and property of another, I cannot legally, but I can morally, divest myself.
Another
Cannot
Ceremony
Gives
I can
Law
Legally
Me
Morally
Myself
Over
Person
Property
Rights
Property in man, always morally unjust, has become nationally dangerous.
Always
Become
Dangerous
Man
Morally
Property
Unjust
Property that endangers the safety of a nation should not be suffered to remain in the hands of its citizens.
Citizens
Hands
Nation
Property
Remain
Safety
Should
Suffered
The dangers which threaten us are twofold: First, from the Confederate forces, composed of men whose earnest convictions and reckless bravery it is idle to deny.
Bravery
Composed
Confederate
Convictions
Dangers
Deny
Earnest
First
Forces
Idle
Men
Reckless
Threaten
Us
The people are forbidden to give aid and comfort to rebels. What of a government that has the power to cut off from aid and comfort all the rebels of the South and fails to exercise it?
Aid
Comfort
Cut
Exercise
Fails
Forbidden
Give
Government
Off
People
Power
Rebels
South
There is a measure needing courage to adopt and enforce it, which I believe to be of virtue sufficient to redeem the nation in this its darkest hour: one only; I know of no other to which we may rationally trust for relief from impending dangers without and within.
Adopt
Believe
Courage
Dangers
Darkest
Enforce
Hour
I believe
Know
May
Measure
Nation
Needing
Only
They feel assured, as to yourself, that if the option remain with you, it is but a question of time and of form when and how a proclamation of emancipation will be issued.
Assured
Emancipation
Feel
Form
How
Option
Proclamation
Question
Remain
Time
Will
You
Yourself
We can constitutionally extirpate slavery at this time.
Slavery
Time
Wisdom, prudence, forethought, these are essential. But not second to these that noble courage which adventures the right, and leaves the consequences to God.
Adventures
Consequences
Courage
Essential
God
Leaves
Noble
Prudence
Right
Second
Which
Wisdom
How few, since the foundation of the world, have found themselves in a position environed with public perils so numerous, oppressed with responsibilities so high and solemn, as yourself!
Few
Found
Foundation
High
How
Numerous
Oppressed
Perils
Position
Public
Since
Solemn
Themselves
World
If, amid the multitude of contending counsel, you have hesitated and doubted; if, when a great measure suggested itself, you have shrunk from the vast responsibility, afraid to go forward lest you should go wrong, what wonder?
Afraid
Contending
Counsel
Doubted
Forward
Go
Great
Itself
Lest
Measure
Multitude
Responsibility
Should
Suggested

Robert Dale Owen essays

Read more informative topics on our blog
Composition about The girl Rebel:
Starting in the 1830s, a state-by-state drive to forbid abortion produced and was largely powerful by 1880. It was sparked by a backlash against the can certainly rights motion that mirrored anxieties regarding women deserting their regular position because mothers, through professionalizing medical professionals eager to restrict their competition from "irregular" practitioners, quite a few offering child killingilligal baby killing services. After that in 1873 all birth-control information was specifically included within the meaning of the indecent and was therefore..
Subscribe to our updates
79 345 subscribers already with us

Related authors

David Sedaris
David Sedaris
David Sedaris, in full David Raymond Sedaris, (born December 26, 1956, Johnson City, New York, U.S.),..
Bei Dao
Bei Dao
Bei Dao, Wade-Giles romanization Pei Tao, also spelled Beidao, original name Zhao Zhenkai, (born..
Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell
Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell
Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell, nee Stevenson, (born Sept. 29, 1810, Chelsea, London, Eng.--died..
Adonis
Adonis
Adonis, Arabic Adunis, pseudonym of ?Ali Ahmad Sa?id Isbar, (born 1930, Qassabin, near Latakia,..
Neil Simon
Neil Simon
Neil Simon, in full Marvin Neil Simon, (born July 4, 1927, Bronx, New York, U.S.--died August 26,..
Statius
Statius
Statius, in full Publius Papinius Statius, (born ad 45, Neapolis, Italy--died 96, probably Neapolis?),..
Flora Adams Darling
Flora Adams Darling
Flora Adams Darling, nee Flora Adams, (born July 25, 1840, Lancaster, N.H., U.S.--died Jan. 6, 1910,..
Anne Spencer Morrow Lindbergh
Anne Spencer Morrow Lindbergh
Anne Spencer Morrow Lindbergh, American writer and aviator (born June 22, 1906, Englewood, N.J.--died..
Margaret of Angouleme
Margaret of Angouleme
Margaret of Angouleme, also called Margaret of Navarre, French Marguerite d'Angouleme or Marguerite..
Yevgeny Yevtushenko
Yevgeny Yevtushenko
Yevgeny Yevtushenko, in full Yevgeny Aleksandrovich Yevtushenko, also spelled Evgenii Evtushenko,..
Arne Evensen Garborg
Arne Evensen Garborg
Arne Evensen Garborg, Arne also spelled Adne, (born January 25, 1851, Time, Norway--died January..
Sir Fred Hoyle
Sir Fred Hoyle
Sir Fred Hoyle, (born June 24, 1915, Bingley, Yorkshire [now West Yorkshire], England--died August..
Theodore Beza
Theodore Beza
Theodore Beza, French Theodore de Beze, (born June 24, 1519, Vezelay, France--died October 13,..
Sir William Davenant
Sir William Davenant
Sir William Davenant, Davenant also spelled D'Avenant, (born February 1606, Oxford, Eng.--died..
Ziya Gokalp
Ziya Gokalp
Ziya Gokalp, pseudonym of Mehmed Ziya, (born March 23, 1876, Diyarbakir, Ottoman Empire [now in..
James Joseph Sylvester
James Joseph Sylvester
James Joseph Sylvester, (born September 3, 1814, London, England--died March 15, 1897, London),..
Savinien Cyrano de Bergerac
Savinien Cyrano de Bergerac
Savinien Cyrano de Bergerac, (born March 6, 1619, Paris--died July 28, 1655, Paris), French satirist..
Yury Karlovich Olesha
Yury Karlovich Olesha
Yury Karlovich Olesha, (born March 3 [February 19, Old Style], 1899, Elizavetgrad, Ukraine, Russian..
Sir Stephen Spender
Sir Stephen Spender
Sir Stephen Spender, in full Sir Stephen Harold Spender, (born February 28, 1909, London, England--died..
Giuseppe Ungaretti
Giuseppe Ungaretti
Giuseppe Ungaretti, (born Feb. 10, 1888, Alexandria--died June 1, 1970, Milan), Italian poet,..