Rainer Maria Rilke (December 04, 1875 - December 29, 1926)
Born: 4th December, 1875
Died: 29th December, 1926
Nationality: German
Profession/Occupation: Poet
Region: Prague, Czechoslovakia
Literary movement: Modernism
Notable works: "Duino Elegies", "The Notebook of Malte Laurids Brigge", "Sonnets to Orpheus", "Das Stunden-Buch", "Das Marienleben"
Genres: Fiction
Types of literature: Poems, Prose

Rainer Maria Rilke Facts

Biography

Rainer Maria Rilke, original name René Maria Rilke, (born Dec. 4, 1875, Prague, Bohemia, Austria-Hungary [now in Czech Republic]—died Dec. 29, 1926, Valmont, Switz.), Austro-German poet who became internationally famous with such works as Duino Elegies and Sonnets to Orpheus.

Early life.

Rilke was the only son of a not-too-happy marriage. His father, Josef, a civil servant, was a man frustrated in his career; his mother, the daughter of an upper-middle-class merchant and imperial councillor, was a difficult woman, who felt that she had married beneath her. She left her husband in 1884 and moved to Vienna so as to be close to the imperial court.

Rilke’s education was ill planned and fragmentary. It had been decided that he was to become an officer to assure him the social standing barred to his father. Consequently, after some years at a rather select school run by the Piarist brothers of Prague, he was enrolled in the military lower Realschule of Sankt Pölten (Austria) and four years later entered the military upper Realschule at Mährisch-Weisskirchen (Bohemia). These two schools were completely at variance with the needs of this highly sensitive boy, and he finally was forced to leave the school prematurely because of poor health. In later life he called these years a time of merciless affliction, a “primer of horror.” After another futile year spent at the Academy of Business Administration at Linz (1891–92), Rilke, with the energetic help of a paternal uncle, was able to straighten out his misguided educational career. In the summer of 1895, he completed the course of studies at the German Gymnasium (a school designed to prepare for the university) of the Prague suburb of Neustadt.

By the time he left school, Rilke had already published a volume of poetry (1894), and he had no doubt that he would pursue a literary career. Matriculating at Prague’s Charles University in 1895, he enrolled in courses in German literature and art history and, to appease his family, read one semester of law. But he could not become really involved in his studies, and so in 1896 he left school and went to Munich, a city whose artistic and cosmopolitan atmosphere held a strong appeal. Thus began his mature life, of the restless travels of a man driven by inner needs, and of the artist who managed to persuade others of the validity of his vision. The European continent in all its breadth and variety—Russia, France, Spain, Austria, Switzerland, and Italy—was to be the physical setting of that life.

Maturity.

In May 1897 Rilke met Lou Andreas-Salomé, who shortly became his mistress. Lou, 36 years of age, was from St. Petersburg, the daughter of a Russian general and a German mother. In her youth she had been wooed by, and refused, the philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche; 10 years before her meeting with Rilke she had married a German professor. Rilke’s affair with Lou was a turning point in his life. More than mistress, she was surrogate mother, the leading influence in his éducation sentimentale, and, above all, the person who introduced Russia to him. Even after their affair ended, Lou remained his close friend and confidante. In late 1897 he followed her to Berlin to take part in her life as far as possible.

Russia was a milestone in Rilke’s life. It was the first and most incisive of a series of “elective homelands,” leaving a deeper mark than any of his subsequent discoveries, with the possible exception of Paris. He and Lou visited Russia first in the spring of 1899 and then in the summer of 1900. There he found an external reality that he saw as the ideal symbol of his feelings, his inner reality. Russia for him was imbued with an amorphous, elemental, almost religiously moving quality—a harmonious, powerful constellation of “God,” “human community,” and “nature”—the distillation of the “cosmic” spirit of being.

Russia evoked in him a poetic response that he later said marked the true beginning of his serious work: a long three-part cycle of poems written between 1899 and 1903, Das Stunden-Buch (1905). Here the poetic “I” presents himself to the reader in the guise of a young monk who circles his god with swarms of prayers, a god conceived as the incarnation of “life,” as the numinous quality of the innerworldly diversity of “things.” The language and motifs of the work are largely those of Europe of the 1890s: Art Nouveau, moods inspired by the dramas of Henrik Ibsen and Maurice Maeterlinck, the enthusiasm for art of John Ruskin and Walter Pater, and, above all, the emphasis on “life” of Nietzsche’s philosophy. Yet, the self-celebratory fervour of these devotional exercises, with their rhythmic, suggestive power and flowing musicality, contained a completely new element. In them, a poet of unique stature had found his voice.

Soon after his second trip to Russia, Rilke joined the artists’ colony of Worpswede, near Bremen, where he hoped to settle down among congenial artists experimenting with developing a new life-style. In April 1901 he married Clara Westhoff, a young sculptor from Bremen who had studied with Auguste Rodin. The couple set up housekeeping in a farm cottage in nearby Westerwede. There Rilke worked on the second part of the Stunden-Buch and also wrote a book about the Worpswede colony. In December 1901 Clara gave birth to a daughter, and soon afterward the two decided on a friendly separation so as to be free to pursue their separate careers.

Rilke was commissioned by a German publisher to write a book about Rodin and went to Paris, where the sculptor lived, in 1902. For the next 12 years Paris was the geographic centre of Rilke’s life. He frequently left the city for visits to other cities and countries, beginning in the spring of 1903, when, to recover from what seemed to him the indifferent life of Paris, he went to Viareggio, Italy. There he wrote the third part of the Stunden-Buch. He also worked in Rome (1903–04), in Sweden (1904), and repeatedly in Capri (1906–08); he travelled to the south of France, Spain, Tunisia, and Egypt and frequently visited friends in Germany and Austria. Yet Paris was his second elective home, no less important than Russia, for both its historic, human, “scenic” qualities and its intellectual challenge.

Rilke’s Paris was not the belle époque capital steeped in luxury and eroticism; it was a city of abysmal, dehumanizing misery, of the faceless and the dispossessed, and of the aged, sick, and dying. It was the capital of fear, poverty, and death. His preoccupation with these phenomena combined with a second one: his growing awareness of new approaches to art and creativity, an awareness gained through his association with Rodin. Their friendship lasted until the spring of 1906. Rodin taught him his personal art ethic of unremitting work, which stood in sharp contrast to the traditional idea of artistic inspiration. Rodin’s method was one of dedication to detail and nuance and of unswerving search for “form” in the sense of concentration and objectivization. Rodin also gave Rilke new insight into the treasures of the Louvre, the Cathedral of Chartres, and the forms and shapes of Paris. Of the literary models, the poet Charles Baudelaire impressed him the most.

During those Paris years Rilke developed a new style of lyrical poetry, the so-called Ding-Gedicht (“object poem”), which attempts to capture the plastic essence of a physical object. Some of the most successful of these poems are imaginative verbal translations of certain works of the visual arts. Other poems deal with landscapes, portraits, and biblical and mythological themes as a painter would depict them. These Neue Gedichte (1907–08) represented a departure from traditional German lyric poetry. Rilke forced his language to such extremes of subtlety and refinement that it may be characterized as a distinct art among other arts and a language distinct from existing languages. The worldly elegance of these poems cannot obscure their inherent emotional and moral engagement. When Rilke, in letters about Paul Cézanne written in the autumn of 1907, defines the painter’s method as a “using up of love in anonymous labour,” he doubtless was also speaking of himself. In a letter to Lou Salomé written in July 1903, he had defined his method with this formulation: “making objects out of fear.”

Die Aufzeichnungen des Malte Laurids Brigge (1910; The Notebook of Malte Laurids Brigge, 1930), on which he began work in Rome in 1904, is a prose counterpart to the Neue Gedichte. That which hovered in the background in the poems, behind the perfection of style, is in the foreground of the prose work: the subjective, personal problems of the lonely occupant of a Paris hotel room, the “fear” that is the inspiration for the creation of “the objects.” If the poems seem like a glorious affirmation of the Symbolists’ idea of “pure poetry,” the Aufzeichnungen reads like a brilliant early example of Existentialist writing. It is an artfully assembled suite of descriptive, reminiscent, and meditative parts, supposedly written by Malte, a young Danish expatriate in Paris who refuses to abide by the traditional chronology of narrative exposition but, instead, presents his themes as “simultaneous” occurrences set against a background of an all-encompassing “spatial time.” Here are found all of Rilke’s major themes: love, death, the fears of childhood, the idolization of woman, and, finally, the matter of “God,” which is treated simply as a “tendency of the heart.” The work must be seen as the description of the disintegration of a soul—but a disintegration not devoid of a dialectic mental reservation: “Only a step,” writes Malte, “and my deepest misery could turn into bliss.”

The price Rilke paid for these masterpieces was a writing block and depression so severe that it led him to toy with the idea of giving up writing. Aside from a short poetry cycle, Das Marienleben (1913), he did not publish anything for 13 years. The first works in which he transcended even his Neue Gedichte were written early in 1912—two long poems in the style of elegies. He did not undertake their immediate publication, however, because they promised to become part of a new cycle. He wrote these two poems while staying at Duino Castle, near Trieste.

At the outbreak of World War I Rilke was in Munich, where he decided to remain, spending most of the war there. In December 1915 he was called up for military service with the Austrian army at Vienna, but by June 1916 he had returned to civilian life. The social climate of these years was inimical to his way of life and to his poetry, and when the war ended he felt almost completely paralyzed. He had only one relatively productive phase: the fall of 1915, when, in addition to a series of new poems, he wrote the “Fourth Duino Elegy.”

Late life.

Rilke spent the next seven years in Switzerland, the last of his series of elective homes. He once more came into full command of his creative gifts. In the summer of 1921 he took up residence at the Château de Muzot, a castle in the Rhône Valley, as the guest of a Swiss patron. In February 1922, within the space of a few days of obsessive productivity, he completed the Duino cycle begun years earlier and, unexpectedly and almost effortlessly, another superb cycle of 55 poems, in mood and theme closely related to the Elegies—his Sonette an Orpheus (Sonnets to Orpheus).

The Duineser Elegien (Duino Elegies) are the culmination of the development of Rilke’s poetry. That which in the Stunden-Buch had begun as a naively uncertain celebration of “life,” as a devotional exercise of mystical worship of God, and which in Malte led him to assert that “this life suspended over an abyss is in fact impossible” in the Elegies sounds an affirmative note, in panegyric justification of life as an entity: “The affirmation of life and death prove to be identical in the Elegies,” wrote Rilke in 1925. These poems can be seen as a new myth that reflects the condition of “modern” man, the condition of an emancipated, “disinherited” consciousness maintaining itself as a counterpart to the traditional cosmic image of Christianity. Like Nietzsche, Rilke opposes the Christian dualism of immanence and transcendence. Instead, he speaks out for an emphatic monism of the “cosmic inner space,” gathering life and death, earth and space, and all dimensions of time into one all-encompassing unity. This Rilkean myth is articulated in an image-laden cosmology that, analogous to medieval models, sees all of reality—from animal to “angel”—as a hierarchical order. This cosmology in turn results in a systematic, consistent doctrine of life and being in which man is assigned the task of transforming everything that is visible into the invisible through the power of his sensory perceptions: “We are the bees of the invisible.” And this ultimate fate of man is concretized in the activity that alternately is called “saying,” “singing,” “extolling,” or “praising.” Thus the poet is turned into the protagonist of humanity, its representative “before the Angel” (the pseudonym of God), as in the “Ninth Elegy,” and even more strikingly in the Sonnets to Orpheus. This message of the late Rilke has been celebrated by some as a new religion of “life” and rejected by others as the expression of an unbridled aestheticism and an attempt on the part of the poet at “self-redemption” by virtue of his personal gift.

The triumphant breakthrough of February 1922 was Rilke’s last major contribution, yet both thematically and stylistically some of his late poems go beyond even the Elegies and the Sonnets in their experimentation with forms that no longer seem at all related to the nature of the poetic language of the 1920s. In addition to these late works he also wrote a number of simple, almost songlike poems, some short cycles, and four collections in French, in which he pays homage to the landscape of Valais.

Muzot remained his home, but he continued his travels, mostly within Switzerland, devoting himself to his friends and his vast, superbly articulate correspondence. Early in 1925 he again went to Paris, with whose literary life he had remained in close touch. He was royally received by such old friends as André Gide and Paul Valéry as well as by new admirers; for the first and only time in his life he was at the centre of a literary season in a European metropolis. But the strain of this visit proved too much for his frail health. On August 18, unannounced, he slipped out of Paris. He had been ill since 1923, but the cause of his debility, a rare form of incurable leukemia, was not diagnosed until a few weeks before his death in 1926. He died at a sanatorium above Territet, on Lake Geneva.

Top 36 Rainer Maria Rilke quotes

There are no classes in life for beginners; right away you are always asked to deal with what is most difficult.
Always
Asked
Away
Beginners
Classes
Deal
Difficult
Life
Most
Right
Right away
You
The deepest experience of the creator is feminine, for it is experience of receiving and bearing.
Bearing
Creator
Deepest
Experience
Feminine
Receiving
Perhaps everything terrible is in its deepest being something helpless that wants help from us.
Being
Deepest
Everything
Help
Helpless
Perhaps
Something
Terrible
Us
Wants
There are quantities of human beings, but there are many more faces, for each person has several.
Beings
Each
Faces
Human
Human beings
Many
More
Person
Quantities
Several
Once the realization is accepted that even between the closest human beings infinite distances continue, a wonderful living side by side can grow, if they succeed in loving the distance between them which makes it possible for each to see the other whole against the sky.
Accepted
Against
Beings
Between
Closest
Continue
Distance
Distances
Each
Even
Grow
Human
Human beings
Infinite
Perhaps all the dragons of our lives are princesses who are only waiting to see us once beautiful and brave.
Beautiful
Brave
Dragons
Lives
Once
Only
Our
Our lives
Perhaps
See
Us
Waiting
Who
Who has not sat before his own heart's curtain? It lifts: and the scenery is falling apart.
Apart
Before
Curtain
Falling
Heart
His
Lifts
Own
Sat
Scenery
Who
There may be good, but there are no pleasant marriages.
Good
Marriages
May
Pleasant
More belongs to marriage than four legs in a bed.
Bed
Belongs
Four
Legs
Marriage
More
Than
It is a tremendous act of violence to begin anything. I am not able to begin. I simply skip what should be the beginning.
Able
Act
Am
Anything
Begin
Beginning
I am
Should
Simply
Skip
Tremendous
Violence
This is the miracle that happens every time to those who really love: the more they give, the more they possess.
Every
Every time
Give
Happens
Love
Miracle
More
Possess
Really
Those
Time
Who
One had to take some action against fear when once it laid hold of one.
Action
Against
Fear
Had
Hold
Laid
Once
Some
Take
For one human being to love another; that is perhaps the most difficult of all our tasks, the ultimate, the last test and proof, the work for which all other work is but preparation.
Another
Being
Difficult
Human
Human being
Last
Love
Most
Other
Our
Perhaps
Preparation
Proof
Tasks
Believe that with your feelings and your work you are taking part in the greatest; the more strongly you cultivate this belief, the more will reality and the world go forth from it.
Belief
Believe
Cultivate
Feelings
Forth
Go
Greatest
More
Part
Reality
Strongly
Taking
Will
Work
All the soarings of my mind begin in my blood.
Begin
Blood
Mind
Surely all art is the result of one's having been in danger, of having gone through an experience all the way to the end, where no one can go any further.
Any
Art
Been
Danger
End
Experience
Further
Go
Gone
Having
No-one
Result
Surely
Through
All emotions are pure which gather you and lift you up; that emotion is impure which seizes only one side of your being and so distorts you.
Being
Emotion
Emotions
Gather
Impure
Lift
Only
Pure
Side
Up
Which
You
Your
Let life happen to you. Believe me: life is in the right, always.
Always
Believe
Happen
Life
Me
Right
You
Live your questions now, and perhaps even without knowing it, you will live along some distant day into your answers.
Along
Answers
Day
Distant
Even
Knowing
Live
Now
Perhaps
Questions
Some
Will
Without
You
The purpose of life is to be defeated by greater and greater things.
Defeated
Greater
Life
Purpose
Things
Spring has returned. The Earth is like a child that knows poems.
Child
Earth
Knows
Like
Poems
Returned
Spring
He reproduced himself with so much humble objectivity, with the unquestioning, matter of fact interest of a dog who sees himself in a mirror and thinks: there's another dog.
Another
Dog
Fact
He
Himself
Humble
Interest
Matter
Mirror
Much
Objectivity
Sees
Thinks
Who
The only journey is the one within.
Journey
Only
Within
There are so many things about which some old man ought to tell one while one is little; for when one is grown one would know them as a matter of course.
About
Course
Grown
Know
Little
Man
Many
Matter
Old
Old man
Ought
Some
Tell
Them
Truly to sing, that is a different breath.
Breath
Different
Sing
Truly
Everything is blooming most recklessly; if it were voices instead of colors, there would be an unbelievable shrieking into the heart of the night.
Blooming
Colors
Everything
Heart
Instead
Most
Night
Unbelievable
Voices
Were
Would
Would-be
If your daily life seems poor, do not blame it; blame yourself that you are not poet enough to call forth its riches; for the Creator, there is no poverty.
Blame
Call
Creator
Daily
Daily life
Enough
Forth
Life
Poet
Poor
Poverty
Riches
Seems
You
Love consists in this, that two solitudes protect and touch and greet each other.
Consists
Each
Greet
Love
Other
Protect
Touch
Two
I want to be with those who know secret things or else alone.
Alone
Else
Know
Secret
Things
Those
Want
Who
Love is like the measles. The older you get it, the worse the attack.
Attack
Get
Like
Love
Love is
Measles
Older
Worse
You
No great art has ever been made without the artist having known danger.
Art
Artist
Been
Danger
Ever
Great
Great art
Having
Known
Made
Without
The future enters into us, in order to transform itself in us, long before it happens.
Before
Future
Happens
Itself
Long
Transform
Us
I hold this to be the highest task for a bond between two people: that each protects the solitude of the other.
Between
Bond
Each
Highest
Hold
Other
People
Protects
Solitude
Task
Two
Two people
It is good to be solitary, for solitude is difficult; that something is difficult must be a reason the more for us to do it.
Difficult
Good
More
Must
Reason
Solitary
Solitude
Something
Us
A person isn't who they are during the last conversation you had with them - they're who they've been throughout your whole relationship.
Been
Conversation
Had
Last
Person
Relationship
Them
Throughout
Who
Whole
You
Your
And now we welcome the new year. Full of things that have never been.
Been
Full
Never
New
New year
Now
Things
Welcome
Year

Rainer Maria Rilke books

Rilke on Love and Other Difficulties: Translations and Considerations

Rilke on Love and Other Difficulties: Translations and Considerations

The Selected Poetry of Rainer Maria Rilke: Bilingual Edition (English and German Edition)

The Selected Poetry of Rainer Maria Rilke: Bilingual Edition (English and German Edition)

Letters to a Young Poet

Letters to a Young Poet

Rilke's Book of Hours: Love Poems to God

Rilke's Book of Hours: Love Poems to God

You Must Change Your Life: The Story of Rainer Maria Rilke and Auguste Rodin

You Must Change Your Life: The Story of Rainer Maria Rilke and Auguste Rodin

Duino Elegies & The Sonnets to Orpheus: A Dual-Language Edition (Vintage International)

Duino Elegies & The Sonnets to Orpheus: A Dual-Language Edition (Vintage International)

The Poet's Guide to Life: The Wisdom of Rilke

The Poet's Guide to Life: The Wisdom of Rilke

The Notebooks of Malte Laurids Brigge (Penguin Classics)

The Notebooks of Malte Laurids Brigge (Penguin Classics)

The Poetry of Rilke

The Poetry of Rilke

Letters to a Young Poet (A Penguin Classics Hardcover)

Letters to a Young Poet (A Penguin Classics Hardcover)

A Year with Rilke: Daily Readings from the Best of Rainer Maria Rilke

A Year with Rilke: Daily Readings from the Best of Rainer Maria Rilke

Prayers of a Young Poet

Prayers of a Young Poet

Rainer Maria Rilke essays

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Examining Factors Affecting Our Perception Philosophy Essay
A process where specific organize and interpret their sensory impressions to be able to give so this means to their environment [P. Robbins business patterns, pg, 136]. Individuals, but in fact offered way to the exterior environment based on their behavior alternatively way, but what they see or believe it to be. A business their workers can spend huge amount of money to make a pleasurable working environment. However, despite these expenses if a worker believes his / her job is substandard, the worker will behave appropriately. This patterns makes her or him based on that employee understanding..
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