Mortimer J. Adler (December 28, 1902 - June 28, 2001)
Born: 28th December, 1902
Died: 28th June, 2001
Region: New York City, New York, San Mateo, California
Notable works: "The Paideia Proposal: An Educational Manifesto", "The Paideia Program: An Educational Syllabus"

Mortimer J. Adler Facts

Biography

Mortimer J. Adler, in full Mortimer Jerome Adler, (born December 28, 1902, New York, New York, U.S.--died June 28, 2001, San Mateo, California), American philosopher, educator, editor, and advocate of adult and general education by study of the great writings of the Western world.

While still in public school, Adler was taken on as a copyboy by the New York Sun, where he stayed for two years doing a variety of editorial work full-time. He then attended Columbia University, completed his coursework for a bachelor's degree, but did not receive a diploma because he had refused physical education (swimming). He stayed at Columbia to teach and earn a Ph.D. (1928) and then became professor of the philosophy of law at the University of Chicago. There, with Robert M. Hutchins, he became a proponent of the pursuit of liberal education through regular discussions based on reading great books. He had studied under John Erskine in a special honours course at Columbia in which the "best sellers of ancient times" were read as a "cultural basis for human understanding and communication."

Adler was associated with Hutchins in editing the 54-volume Great Books of the Western World (1952) and conceived and directed the preparation of its two-volume index of great ideas, the Syntopicon.

In 1952 Adler became director of the Institute for Philosophical Research (initially in San Francisco and from 1963 in Chicago), which prepared The Idea of Freedom, 2 vol. (1958-61). His books include How to Read a Book (1940; rev. ed. 1972), A Dialectic of Morals (1941), The Capitalist Manifesto (with Louis O. Kelso, 1958), The Revolution in Education (with Milton Mayer, 1958), Aristotle for Everyone (1978), How to Think About God (1980), and Six Great Ideas (1981).

With Hutchins, Adler edited for Encyclopaedia Britannica, Inc., the 10-volume Gateway to the Great Books (1963) and from 1961 an annual, The Great Ideas Today. He also headed the editorial staff of Britannica's 20-volume Annals of America, which included a two-volume Conspectus, Great Issues in American Life (1968). Under the sponsorship of Britannica, he delivered several series of lectures at the University of Chicago that were published later as books: The Conditions of Philosophy (1965), The Difference of Man and the Difference It Makes (1967), and The Time of Our Lives (1970). In 1969 he became director of planning for the 15th edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica, published in 1974. He was chairman of the Encyclopaedia Britannica's Board of Editors from 1974 to 1995.

Adler's memoirs consist of Philosopher at Large: An Intellectual Autobiography (1977) and A Second Look in the Rearview Mirror (1992). As the spokesman for a group of noted educators, he wrote, after considerable study and debate, The Paideia Proposal: An Educational Manifesto (1982) and The Paideia Program: An Educational Syllabus (1984), calling for the abolition in American schools of multitrack educational systems, arguing that a single elementary and secondary school program for all students would ensure the upgrading of the curriculum and the quality of instruction to serve the needs of the brightest and to lift the achievement of the least advantaged. He proposed that specialized vocational or preprofessional training be given only after students had completed a full course of basic education in the humanities, arts, sciences, and language. Also among Adler's later works are How to Speak, How to Listen: A Guide to Pleasurable and Profitable Conversation (1983) and Ten Philosophical Mistakes (1985).

Mortimer J. Adler essays

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