Louise Erdrich (June 07, 1954 - ..)
Born: 7th June, 1954
Nationality: American
Profession/Occupation: Writer
Region: Little Falls, Minnesota, "The Crown of Columbus", "The Blue Jay's Dance: A Birth Year", "The Antelope Wife", "The Plague of Doves", "Love Medicine", "The Round House", "Tracks", "The Bingo Palace", "The Last Report on the Miracles at Little No Horse", "Fu
Notable works: National Book Award

Louise Erdrich Facts

Biography

Louise Erdrich, in full Karen Louise Erdrich, (born June 7, 1954, Little Falls, Minnesota, U.S.), American author whose principal subject is the Ojibwa Indians in the northern Midwest.

Erdrich grew up in Wahpeton, North Dakota, where her German American father and half-Ojibwa mother taught at a Bureau of Indian Affairs boarding school. She attended Dartmouth College (B.A., 1976) and Johns Hopkins University (M.A., 1979). While at Dartmouth she met writer and anthropologist Michael Dorris (1945-97), whom she married (1981) and with whom she collaborated in writing some of her novels, notably The Crown of Columbus (1991); the couple was in the process of divorcing when Dorris committed suicide in 1997.

After Erdrich's short story "The World's Greatest Fisherman" won the 1982 Nelson Algren fiction prize, it became the basis of her first novel, Love Medicine (1984; expanded edition, 1993). Love Medicine began a tetralogy that includes The Beet Queen (1986), Tracks (1988), and The Bingo Palace (1994), about the Indian families living on or near a North Dakota Ojibwa reservation and the whites they encounter. Tales of Burning Love (1996) and The Antelope Wife (1998) detail tumultuous relationships between men and women and their aftermath. Erdrich returned to the setting of her earlier novels for The Last Report on the Miracles at Little No Horse (2001), about the tribulations of a woman who assumes the identity of a priest in order to take up his position on a reservation.

Erdrich then shifted away from Native American themes to explore the German, Polish, and Scandinavian citizens of a small North Dakota town in The Master Butchers Singing Club (2003). Her later novels include The Plague of Doves (2008), which centres on a young protagonist trying to understand the long-standing tension between her Native American family and their white neighbours, and Shadow Tag (2010), which chronicles the unraveling of a marriage and the effect it has on the children. The Round House (2012), in which an Ojibwa teenager seeks justice after his mother is raped, won the National Book Award. LaRose (2016) investigates tragedy, grief, and Ojibwa tradition through the story of a boy whose parents give him to their neighbour's family after his father accidentally shoots their son. Erdrich's next novel, Future Home of the Living God (2017), was something of a departure from her previous works. The dystopian novel centres on the struggles of a pregnant woman following a catastrophic global event.

Erdrich's novels were noted for their depth of characterization; they are peopled by a variety of characters, some of whom appear in multiple stories within her oeuvre. For many of the Native Americans about whom she wrote, contact with white culture brings such elements as alcoholism, Roman Catholicism, and government policies to tear down the Indian community, though tradition and loyalty to family and heritage work to counteract these forces.

Erdrich also wrote poetry, short stories, and children's books, including The Birchbark House (1999), which launched a series (The Game of Silence [2005], The Porcupine Year [2008], and Chickadee [2012]). Her The Blue Jay's Dance: A Birth Year (1995) is a meditation on her experience of pregnancy, motherhood, and writing. In 2015 Erdrich was a recipient of the U.S. Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction.

Louise Erdrich essays

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A Short Tale 'The Red Convertible'
"The Red Convertible" is a brief story, written by Louise Erdrich. This tale is about the brotherhood between Lyman Lamartine and his more mature brother Henry. The narrator considers himself as Lyman to see their story. Lots of things happen at that time since they choose the car together. Throughout the story, Lyman tells the history of these romantic relationship and the distinctions of Henry before and after warfare to show the consequences of the warfare could bring to a person. At the first one half of the tale, Lyman introduces himself and his aged brother in sharing a red convertible car...
Louise Erdrichs The Red Convertible English Literature Essay
The Red Convertible is approximately a changing marriage between two brothers. The story is defined in North Dakota in the 1970s, where the brothers live on a Chippewa Native American reservation. Lyman and Henry Lamartine are Local American brothers that conclude investing in a red Olds Mobile convertible jointly, that they use to visit throughout different places from North Dakota through to Alaska and back. Throughout these travels the brothers create a fantastic bond between the other person from excellent time spent traveling. Lyman is the younger brother and in comparison to his brother..
Composition on How Conflict Changes a guy in The Red Transformable by Louise Erdrich
It is said that whenever a man earnings from war he is permanently changed. In the short history, "The Crimson Convertible, " Louise Erdrich demonstrates these kinds of transformations by making use of symbolism. Erdrich employs the convertible to characterize the emotional conditions that battle creates to get the jewellry and his family members around him by speaking about the the pre-deployment relationship between two brothers Holly and Lyman, Lyman's understanding of Henry upon Henry's return, and Henry's thought view on existence in the end of the story.Throughout..
Essay regarding The Red Convertible By simply Louise Erdrich
In "The Red Transformable, " Louise Erdrich through her first- person narrator Lyman, makes an unspoken emotional connection between two brothers. This kind of emotional relationship between the friends is in a roundabout way spoken to each other, but is pretty communicated through and symbolized by "The Red Collapsible. " In spite of what appears as a selfless take action by 1 brother, subsequently, causes pain in the other brother, because no feelings were conveyed. In this case, Lyman explains his version as he takes us through the encounters that he and his sibling..
Composition about Styles of Loss in "The Shawl" and "Bone Black"
The loss of a member of family is always hard to deal with and it influences everyone in different ways. Some people happen to be open about their feelings while others bottle them up. Regarding relationships within a family, generally the closest is between the parent and child. The moment this romantic relationship is slice short or perhaps is nonexistent because of a loss it can be specifically devastating. The losing of a family member will not always label an actual physical loss, although can also refer to an psychological distance place between a couple. In "The Shawl" by simply..
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